Categories
How-to

The Tin-Can Wonder – a low-tech, DIY mimeograph machine

Thanks to a lucky find — a stash of 1940s and 50s fanzines hidden in a trunk for safekeeping in a Riverside attic — donated to the University of Iowa library, instructions for making mimeography’s most stripped-down variation are now available. Rich Dana (UI graduate), prompted by Pete Balestrieri’s (Curator of Science Fiction and Popular Culture Collections at UI) discovery and mention of the information he found in a supplement to Science Fiction World, scanned the instructions for making a DIY mimeograph machine and they’re now available to all.

Here, Rich and Pete talk about the history of the main collection that yielded this gem, the fanzine-world in general, and the Tin-Can Wonder specifically. Rich also heads to his secret workshop to make and use the simple “machine” to print a version of the original instructions (digital copy of the original available below the video). Please download and distribute freely.

Yes, the elusive stencil is still required. In later posts I’ll continue discussing the options available to mimeographers (including making your own).

Categories
Uncategorized

We No Longer Just Have to Consume

What are you going to create?

from Jonathan Zeitlyn’s Print: How You Can Do It Yourself. Journeyman Press. London. 1992.

Zeitlyn’s work fits quite well with Mimeograph Revival’s ethos. He wrote and published on printing and printmaking from a DIY angle. There’s a summary of some of his work here, and you can look here to see if there’s a library copy available near you. I’d be interested to get my hands on both Print and Low Cost Printing for Development: A Printing Handbook for Third World Development and Education now that it’s becoming clearer that my part of the world is quickly heading into a less-developed future.